Thank you, Troy!

Thank you, Troy!

Project Data

Country:Zimbabwe

Project Details

The Sadzausavi workshop in Vingirai Village included 73 trainees (or 42 families) from three villages. Primary school teacher, Abias Makada, initiated and organized the workshop. Before the implementation of the new water well, the gardeners relied mainly on the nearby stream for watering their garden beds. There was a water well close to the garden, but it is hand dug and dries out quickly when there has been no rain. It was not working at the time of the workshop, and was in need of some repairs. The trainers indicated that their number one challenge was water.

During the workshop, members learned how to assemble five raised planting beds as well as one compost pile, and all of the beds were filled with transplants. One full bed was planted with onion seeds. Trainer John Dube reported that three weeks after the completion of the workshop, the group had developed individual compost piles and they were ready for transplanting onions. The group concluded that growing vegetables year-round gives them the best chance to succeed in the local marketplace.

Project Data

Country:Zimbabwe

The Difference It Made!

Your Walk4Water Plus In Action

Before a well was drilled, chairperson Collettah Tagwirei said that her community depended mainly on rain and a small nearby stream for garden water - both of which are seasonal.

"Once the rainy season ends, the stream dries up forcing us to scale down our production," she said. "Our lives have been challenged by the shortages of food and water for both drinking or domestic use."

“I have learned quite a lot," says workshop student Nyengerai Mazodze. "I liked creating the raised planting beds. They are easy to manage opposed to our extra big beds. I appreciate Healing Hands coming here. I am old and just wish more young men and women could learn and adopt these wonderful techniques.”

The gift of fencing materials and clean water, in addition to the Survival Gardening workshop, has helped to strengthen and sustain the community in the midst of a devastating drought, according to local Agriculture Extension Officer Supervisor Mr. Mkadla.

"At this moment in time, with the current drought crisis and economic challenges, we appreciate the support by HHI in mitigating the effects of drought due to climate change and our worst affected economy," Mr. Mkadla said.

“The completed workshop served to revive hard working people with a dying spirit," explained trainer, John Dube. "They had lost hope of surviving through their garden produce. I feel proud as I see the people being rejuvenated into a purpose driven group.”